Getting old while feeling young is complicated. I was born in the 1960s; as a teenager I listened to Bowie, longed to go to Biba and aspired to eat McDonald’s. My lifestyle was liberal; I took drugs and the pill. I bounced about to Jane Fonda workouts and was an early adopter of Pilates. I’d say at 58 I still dress on the right side of timeless: from JW Anderson to Re/done jeans and my crisp Casey-Casey shirts. And I still love Bowie and Pilates. But however youthful my exterior may appear, the memo has not reached my joints. I was diagnosed with degenerative discs in my back 15 years ago, I have to ask my husband to open jars for me because my arthritic hands can’t manage, and it’s no fun trying to get up from the sofa without making “that noise” as I creak to standing. My eyesight is also shot and this week, for the first time ever, I got sciatica, which is really bloody painful! Apart from that, everything is great.

This morning I did a spot of online shopping; I ordered a pair of Adidas x Wales Bonner trainers, a Chanel mascara, and then I went to my new favourite website, Granny Gets a Grip. For those too young to know, its name is a nod to London’s hippest boutique of the 1960s, Granny Takes a Trip – a one-stop marketplace selling an ingenious edit of products designed for bodies that are showing signs of wear and tear. 

Orthopaedic foam booster cushions, £60
Orthopaedic foam booster cushions, £60 © Jooney Woodward
Beech crutch-handle walking sticks, £16
Beech crutch-handle walking sticks, £16 © Jooney Woodward

Founded by friends Sophie Dowling and Miranda Thomas, this website targets people who need a level of physical support but have a Conran Shop aesthetic.

Dowling and Thomas – both in their late 50s, like me, and who have have enjoyed successful careers as a website designer, and physics teacher and magistrate respectively – have scoured the marketplace for products to make life both easier and more chic, from mobility scooters (from £55) to elegant LED reading lights (from £40). The colourful edit is full of satisfyingly practical solutions: long-handled shoe horns (from £15), brightly coloured walking sticks (from £18), ergonomic garden tools designed to minimise bending (from £7.50), a perching stool with stainless-steel legs (from £140), and a sloped sustainable bamboo seat – adjust the height and you’ll never have to worry about standing-induced backache again. The ByAcre red carbon Ultralight rollator (£499) is so sleek I’d happily roll it into Celine while shopping. 

Hardwood furniture raisers, £35
Hardwood furniture raisers, £35

Where possible, Dowling and Thomas have had things made, such as their furniture raisers (from £30), which make it easier to get up from a chair or a sofa. “They usually look awful, like grey plant pots – hence they’re often known as ‘elephant feet’,” shudders Dowling. “We have had attractive square blocks made from bamboo and hardwood – and now they look terrific.”

The Edith Armchair, £1,175, and slimline LED reading light, £190
The Edith Armchair, £1,175, and slimline LED reading light, £190 © Jooney Woodward
Long-handle gardening tools, £20
Long-handle gardening tools, £20 © Jooney Woodward

“We also paid particular attention to hand rails, which usually come in nasty white plastic or metal,” says Thomas. “We had ours made in solid oak with brushed-steel brackets.” It’s a level of detail for a generation who grew up with good design. “My sister is 67; she hung out with The Rolling Stones when she was young,” says Dowling. “She and her friends respond to the bright designs and the chatty language of the site.”

What’s remarkable is that the site feels so pioneering. It offers the opposite of the products in those drab, geriatric catalogues that, once you hit a certain age, start arriving through the door. A recent paper by KPMG/Ipsos Retail Think Tank concluded that the “grey pound” represents the most considerable untapped opportunity in retail: it’s bigger than the “millennial pound” and, thanks to an ageing population, will only increase its market share. 

James the cat with long-handle pet bowls, £25
James the cat with long-handle pet bowls, £25 © Jooney Woodward

I checked out with a haul including a memory foam knee pillow (£30), which ticks a multitude of back-relieving boxes. Almost as exciting were the long-handle pet bowls (£25) – no more creaking first thing – and, lest we forget, the Dycem jar opener (£11). With its non-slip cover, it’s only a tiny thing, and yet it is such a relief not to have to ask for help. Who would have thought mobility aids could be à la mode?

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