This weekend, we look at the Peloton phenomenon. Is it a failing fitness cult or a lasting way to stay healthy? Lilah and San Francisco correspondent Patrick McGee explore the behavioural science behind why we don’t exercise and the tech that tricks our brains into doing it anyway. Then, management editor Andrew Hill tells us why so many bad business books exist at the airport, and what makes a good one


If you want to explore the FT, use this link for special discounts for listeners: http://ft.com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/weekendpodcast


Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We’re on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap


Links and mentions from the episode: 

–Patrick McGee on how connected fitness became the new obsession: https://on-ft-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/32YplFd

–Andrew Hill: ‘Pulp non-fiction: the worst business books of 2022’: https://on-ft-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/34ao7Hz 

–All the winners and shortlisted books for FT and McKinsey's best business books of the year award https://ig-ft-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/sites/business-book-award/ 

–If you want to read more about the culture of Peloton, here’s ‘This is your brain on Peloton’, by Amanda Hess (NYT): https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/16/arts/peloton-cody-rigsby-content.html 

–Anne Helen Peterson is the unofficial internet scholar on Peloton celebrity: https://annehelen.substack.com/p/towards-a-unified-theory-of-peloton 


Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design is by Breen Turner.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Transcripts are not currently available for all podcasts, view our accessibility guide.

Get alerts on FT Weekend podcast when a new story is published

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2022. All rights reserved.
Reuse this content (opens in new window) CommentsJump to comments section

Comments have not been enabled for this article.

Follow the topics in this podcast